Media Ethics and Self-Regulation

Media Ethics and Self-Regulation

In the last two-decades, Nepali media has seen a tremendous development in the number of media outlets and journalists.  Despite these impressive figures, the quality of content is missing even from the national media, let alone regional and community undertakings, which indicates that the growth has only been quantitative. The reluctance of leading media houses to spend on improving the quality of their product by investing in training and capacity building of their staff has had a cascading effect on the entire sector. The result: on the one hand media workers are blamed for being unprofessional, unethical, and immoral, on the other hand, the end product--the contents--are sloppy, riddled with errors and biases, and incomplete. We are working to promote media ethics and create awareness about importance of self-regulation. We collaborate with Press Council Nepal (PCN), the only statutory body which monitors the journalists’ code of conduct.